Vitamin D, What's It All About?

 

What is so important about Vitamin D? And are we getting enough of it as the days get shorter?

So its October. Another summer is well and truly done and dusted. Of course, summer warmth and sunshine isn’t guaranteed in this part of the world, but we soldier on regardless, on windswept beaches and at soggy festivals. You could say we’ve evolved to make the best of it. That pale skin? It’s an important mutation that helps us absorb more Vitamin D from less sunlight. But just what is so important about Vitamin D?

Vitamin D - Blog

Vitamin D, the ‘sunshine’ vitamin, performs many essential functions in the body. Most famously, it helps the body absorb and utilise calcium and phosphorus which are essential for normal teeth and bones. Vitamin D is also important for a healthy immune system, and it plays a role in the life cycle of every cell in the body.

Vitamin D is produced within the body itself when exposed to sunlight, but for six months of the year we simply don’t get enough sunshine anyway. Vitamin D 2 - Blog

The good news is that we can also get Vitamin D through our diet. While most foods have little or no naturally occurring Vitamin D, salmon, swordfish and mackerel are an exception. Tuna and sardines also contain some Vitamin D, but in smaller amounts. Beef liver, egg yolk, cheese and fortified milk are also good place to find the ‘sunshine’ vitamin. But what about vegans? Watch out for fortified foods such as orange juice and that nutritional powerhouse, tofu. Of course, for bone health, we also need to eat calcium-rich foods - milk, yoghurt and cheese, dark leafy greens such as kale and bok choy; sardines and tinned salmon (because it contains the small, calcium-rich bones).

The reality is that we’re not all perfectly healthy or young. We don’t all eat a perfect diet, or get outside in the fresh air enough. In that case, supplementing may be a good idea. Cleanmarine is an excellent source of  Vitamin D. It also contains Omega 3 fatty acids, sourced from clean, sustainable Antarctic krill, which can help look after heart, vision and brain health.

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